Insight Centenary: The possibility of medical research

The possibility of what we can discover from the very fundamental research we do on chronic diseases is what makes my work really interesting.

PhD scholar Tom Guy, T cell Biology

PhD scholar Tom Guy, T cell Biology

As a child, some of my close family suffered from cancer, so when I started university I became fascinated with the study of tumour immunology. I found it intriguing that people were looking to the immune system to fight off cancer as a new form of treatment.

Now that I’m working at Centenary I’ve been able to do 
just that. I’m essentially investigating the best strategy for the immune system to stop tumour growth. I look at two cell types, CD4 T cells and B cells, and how these two cells work together to kill tumours once regulatory T cells (T regs) are switched off. T regs are the network managers of our immune system. Continue reading

New group at Centenary to study health span and ageing

Dr Masaomi Kato

In 1909, when the old age pension for those over 65 was introduced in Australia, life expectancy was about 55. It is now about 80.

For most of the 20th century, people in their 60s and 70s were expected to be seen with walking sticks. Now, many of them are working out regularly in the gym. And, as populations age, the developed world’s biggest health problems are now degenerative diseases rather than infections.

So perhaps it’s not surprising there has been an upsurge in interest in research into ageing—and the Centenary Institute is taking a major interest in applying its unique skill sets and clinical know-how to the problem. Leading the way will be the Institute’s newest research group leader, Dr Masaomi Kato, who moved to Australia from Yale University earlier this year to establish a Laboratory of Ageing.

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