Centenary Institute awarded NHMRC funding to continue vital work

NHMRC National Health and Medical Research Council Grants (NHMRC) to help studies of liver and skin inflammation, sudden heart attacks, the formation of blood vessels and immune cell function and mutation.

Congratulations to all Centenary researchers who have been awarded more than $4 million in the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council Grants (NHMRC) grants.

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How ‘junk DNA’ can control cell development

Centenary Institute Cell

Cell is regarded as one of the most prestigious journal to publish in.

Researchers from the Gene and Stem Cell Therapy Program at Sydney’s Centenary Institute have confirmed that, far from being “junk”, the 97 per cent of human DNA that does not encode instructions for making proteins can play a significant role in controlling cell development.

And in doing so, the researchers have unravelled a previously unknown mechanism for regulating the activity of genes, increasing our understanding of the way cells develop and opening the way to new possibilities for therapy.

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Hope for Hep C cure: No excuse for risk-taking, expert warns

Professor Geoff McCaughan

Exciting early indications of a cure for Hepatitis C do not mean we should become complacent about the risks of contracting the debilitating disease, a leading Australian researcher warns.

Professor Geoff McCaughan, right, head of the Liver Immunobiology Program at Sydney’s Centenary Institute of medical research, says preliminary results of a newly developed oral treatment regime for liver transplant patients with Hepatitis C were showing promising results.

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International award for Centenary stalwart

Liver DiseaseCongratulations to Professor Geoff McCaughan the head of Centenary’s Liver Injury and Cancer research program and director of the Australian National Liver Transplant Unit at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital who has won this year’s Distinguished Service Award of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS).

The award was presented today at ILTS’s International Conference held in Sydney and has been presented annually since 1993 to a member of the Society who has demonstrated outstanding service to ILTS and is a recognized leader in the area of liver transplantation. The list reads like a Who’s Who of transplantation.

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Insight Centenary: The underestimated burden of skin disease.

Skin diseasesAn interview with Dr Philip Tong, PhD scholar in Immune Imaging.

Centenary Institute: “What is it about dermatology and skin research that interests you?”

Dr Philip Tong: “People need to appreciate their skin… it is our largest organ. It’s important that people don’t underestimate the enormous burden of skin disease.

I was drawn to dermatology by chance. My father had an itchy skin condition on his neck that was related to stress. I remember him telling me how much it affected him.

After he’d seen a dermatologist, I could see changes, I could see him getting better – and it was this that compelled me to study skin diseases.

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Skin Diseases – Immune Imaging team plays a major part in International Conference

Skin Diseases

The International Investigative Dermatology Conference was held in Edinburgh, Scotland, this year.

Skin diseases are a global problem. In order to gain a better understanding of skin cancer, eczema and skin infections, it requires international collaboration.

Earlier this month, several members of Centenary’s Immune Imaging laboratory attended the International Investigative Dermatology (IID) meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland.

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Tweeting our way to heart health

Tweeting our way to heart health

[Image: Flickr/MDGovpics, used under the Creative Commons licence]

Real-time social phenomenon, Twitter, can be a powerful tool to help prevent heart disease and improve health practices, according to a group of researchers affiliated with the University of Sydney.

Their study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, surveying 15 international health-focused Twitter accounts, nine professional organisations and six medical journals, were selected for analysis of their Twitter growth, reach, and content.

The study showed that, through its inherent networking, social media sites like Twitter have the potential to enhance education, awareness and overall management of cardiovascular disease.

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Insight Centenary: Why I do cancer research

Why I do Cancer Research

Me and my Dad.

I was seven weeks old when my Dad was diagnosed with cancer.  It was just a tiny lump in his neck.  They had just taken it out, and discovered it was a malignant adenocarcinoma of the parotid salivary gland.  This is a very slow type of cancer, which in a way is fortunate, because I did get to know my Dad.  They had to go back in and remove more tissue, and in doing so the nerve to the right side of his face was damaged.  This meant his face drooped a little on the right side.  To me this was just the way my Dad looked, but he always turned his right side away in photographs.

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