Cardiology, TB, ageing and immunology

Centenary wins support for research thrust

NHMRC

The latest NHMRC funding will help Centenary's ground-breaking research, such as in the T-Cell Biology lab, headed by Professor Barbara Fazekas de St Groth.

Centenary scientists have won over $5 million in the latest NHMRC grant round – with seven research grants and three early career fellowships.

The development of a TB vaccine, the genetic regulation of ageing, the fundamental workings of the immune system, the genetic basis of heart disease—these are some of the research areas of key interest to Centenary Institute for which the Australian Government has announced funding through the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

Centenary also boasts three new NHMRC Early-Career Fellows along with seven significant research projects in the medical research funding released on Friday.

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New group at Centenary to study health span and ageing

Dr Masaomi Kato

In 1909, when the old age pension for those over 65 was introduced in Australia, life expectancy was about 55. It is now about 80.

For most of the 20th century, people in their 60s and 70s were expected to be seen with walking sticks. Now, many of them are working out regularly in the gym. And, as populations age, the developed world’s biggest health problems are now degenerative diseases rather than infections.

So perhaps it’s not surprising there has been an upsurge in interest in research into ageing—and the Centenary Institute is taking a major interest in applying its unique skill sets and clinical know-how to the problem. Leading the way will be the Institute’s newest research group leader, Dr Masaomi Kato, who moved to Australia from Yale University earlier this year to establish a Laboratory of Ageing.

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